A Canine Cookbook

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Many dog owners are flocking to natural homemade food for their pups, especially since store-bought products contain preservatives and other unnatural ingredients that can give dogs allergies and other health problems.

Now you can spoil (and nourish) your pampered pooch with only the best ingredients. In the new book DOGGY DESSERTS: 125 HOMEMADE TREATS FOR HAPPY, HEALTHY DOGS by Cheryl Gianfrancesco, dog owners can rest easy knowing they are providing their pooch with a snack made with only the healthiest of ingredients. This beautiful book presents easy-to-prepare, fun recipes divided into six categories: cookies, bars, drop cookies, cakes, muffins and frozen treats. You’ll have fun with this one!

For dog owners who are concerned about controlling what’s in their dog’s food or who are looking to find low-cal, low-fat options for their slightly plump pups, DOGGY DESSERTS provides many tasty options. From carob peanut butter crunch balls, sweet potato biscuits and liver oatmeal bones to granola bars, apple sauce spice cake, and watermelon dog sherbet, trust me when I say that pet owners will be tempted to try each of these delectable desserts themselves before serving them to their dogs.

This cute and colorful book is filled with photographs that pop and bring all of the recipes to life. DOGGY DESSERTS makes a cool and much-appreciated gift for any avid dog-lover. It’s a scrumptious, canine cookbook.

$10.99 U.S.  CompanionHouse Books

 

 

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Staying Off the Naughty (Spending) List: Ways to Manage Your Finances and Avoid Post-Holiday Blues

The holidays are filled with temptation to overspend.
Financial expert Eric Tyson offers advice on how to manage your holiday spending.

The holidays are upon us, bringing all those personal and family images and sensations we cherish. But for many of us, there are a few not-so-joyous holiday sights (overflowing boxes and bags from our purchases) and sounds (email notifications of our latest orders and purchases online and the ca-ching! of retail cash registers marking our escalating debt). These negatives can easily outweigh all that we love about the holiday season.

“Overall, the 2008 financial crisis and recession brought about a renewed dedication to saving,” says Eric Tyson, author of Personal Finance in Your 20s & 30s For Dummies. “It’s very important that you not let your holiday spending zap all of the saving progress you made during the year.

“Whether it’s a dedication to the gift-giving tradition, a sense of obligation, or a feeling that the holidays entitle us to have a little more fun than usual, too many of us seem to turn a blind eye to the budget-busting reality of all that spending over just a couple of months,” he adds. “Don’t let excessive holiday spending cause unnecessary financial stress for you and your loved ones.”

What if you could have a wonderful, memorable holiday and avoid the financial hangover afterwards? Tyson provides great tips on how to keep your holiday spending in check.

Find an alternative to gift-giving during the holidays. Many people feel they have to give gifts during the holidays, either because it’s a family tradition or because they know their friends and relatives have gotten gifts for them. There are plenty of great ways to trade in this tradition for another one that is even more meaningful, and chances are your family and friends will be happy to save gift-buying dough as well.

“Instead of exchanging gifts, your family members might want to pool their money and spend it on a holiday outing,” says Tyson. “If you have kids, you’ll probably want to get them a little something, but set strict spending limits. Instead of piling up the toys, let each child choose an outing or event that he or she gets to spend with you one-on-one. Kids will look back on the valuable time you’ve spent together a lot more fondly than they will any toy or video game they use a couple of times and then toss aside.”

If you must buy gifts, cut your expenses elsewhere as necessary. Perhaps you’d rather dine out or go to the movies less, or maybe you can forego that new pair of shoes you’ve been wanting for yourself in order to afford gifts for the grandparents. “It doesn’t matter where you make cuts, just that you make them,” says Tyson. “Keeping your other spending under control while you’re out there doing your shopping can be a challenge, but just keep repeating to yourself the importance of not over-spending. That way when it comes time to actually pass out those presents you’ve purchased, you can do it without grimacing as you think about the damage they did to your bank account.”

Set a budget and keep tabs on what you are spending. While you’re doing your holiday shopping, your new best friends should be your bank account and credit card records. It’s easy to get into a spending rhythm when shopping for yourself or others, and that’s why you need to keep track of every purchase you make and make sure you don’t go over your budget. “When you start to add up everything you’re spending, you may be shocked at what all those expenses from this store and that store add up to be,” says Tyson. “And don’t forget about all those ‘necessary’ holiday extras. Most people don’t budget their shopping and don’t realize that by the time you buy all the presents, plus wrapping paper, cards, decorations, etc., it’s added up to a ridiculous amount. Having a budget that you know you must stick to will help keep your impulse spending from getting out of hand and will help you hone in on the most reasonably priced holiday items.”

Plan what you are going to buy, and don’t get any extras! Particularly during the holidays, companies pull out their most appealing packaging in hopes of snagging the eyes of shoppers. That’s why along with your budget, you’re going to want to take an exact list of what you want to buy for your gift recipients. Don’t go shopping for someone’s gift until you know exactly what you are going to buy.

“It’s very easy to go in with no plan, see something you like, and get it simply because you have no idea what else to get for a hard-to-buy-for relative despite the gift’s significant price tag,” says Tyson.

Watch out for deals that seem too good to be true. Retailers and websites run all sorts of specials to induce consumers to buy now, and the holidays offer these companies easy prey in the form of deal-seeking, cash-strapped consumers. For example, furniture stores frequently offer that if you buy now, you don’t have to pay a thing for a year, and you might even get free delivery. This sort of “push” marketing can make it harder for you to say no.

“This is just one example of how stores coax in shoppers,” says Tyson. “Always remember that free financing for, say, a year is not a huge cost to the dealer, but it is a cost, and if you forgo it, you should be able to negotiate a lower purchase price. Retailers find that buyers are less likely to negotiate the price if they are getting a short-term financing break. Read the fine print on any deal you are considering taking before you go to the store to make the purchase. It can be even harder to say no once you get to the store, so you’ll want to know what you are in for before you get there.”

Leave the plastic at home. Many of us can explain away spending so much on gifts because we simply charge everything and reason that we can pay it off gradually after the holidays. This is a great way to create a never-ending cycle of consumer debt for yourself. It only creates unnecessary financial stress for you after the holidays.

“Use your budget to figure out how you can purchase the gifts you want to purchase without putting them on your credit card,” says Tyson. “If you are so cash-strapped that you think it will be difficult to avoid charging gifts, then you may want to sit down with other friends and family and propose a limit on how much gifts can cost this year—or propose no adult gift exchanges at all. Far from being disappointed, it’s likely they’ll view this reprieve from gift-buying as a gift in its own right.”

Invest in your kids’ financial futures. It may not seem as exciting to your kids as a new iPod, but a contribution to their financial well-being will be appreciated long after such expensive “toys” are obsolete. “Have the grandparents contribute to a college tuition fund or savings account rather than buy them more stuff they don’t need,” suggests Tyson. “Or make one of your gifts to your kids a stock fund portfolio that can start accruing now. Also, make them aware of the budgets and tools you are using to keep your spending in check. The holidays are a great time for them to truly learn that money doesn’t grow on trees.”

Give the gift of time to your kids. Often, parents buy gifts for their kids with the best of intentions. Either you don’t want to deprive them of the toys and gadgets all of their friends have, or you want to give them the things you didn’t have as a kid.

“Both of these tendencies are perfectly understandable, but I’ve found that parents who buy too much for their kids often have difficulty changing the habit,” says Tyson. “The holiday season offers great opportunities for you to show your kids how much you love and care for them. For example, you can make time with them each week to watch a holiday film or TV show, go on a walk to see your neighbors’ holiday lights and decorations, or emphasize that giving-back message again and take them caroling at a local retirement home. All of these activities cost next to nothing, and they will be fun for the kids and for you!”

Remember that meaningful gifts don’t necessarily have a big price tag. “Sure, it might be nice to give your mom a brand new TV, but there are other things out there that will be even more meaningful and enjoyable for her,” says Tyson. “If you are looking to give a gift that truly means something and that will keep its value for years to come, you are better off looking for nonmaterial gifts to give than for something your gift recipients could get themselves at the local big box store.”

“Money can easily become the focus of the holidays when it should be the last thing you are thinking about,” says Tyson. “By keeping your spending under control, you can have a great holiday and avoid the sick feeling in the pit of your stomach that occurs when you start getting those January credit card bills. If you prepare properly, you can achieve a happy balance of spending and saving during the holiday season. That’s a great gift in and of itself, for both you and the people you love.”

About the Book:
Personal Finance in Your 20s & 30s For Dummies® (Wiley, 2017, ISBN: 978-1-119-43141-1, $19.99) is available at bookstores nationwide, from major online booksellers, and direct from the publisher by calling 800-225-5945. In Canada, call 800-567-4797. For more information, please visit the book’s page on www.wiley.com.

 

Attract Love, Feed Your Spirit, Manifest Your Dreams

It’s time for some good juju-it’s time for you to start your love affair with crystals! Who better to teach you than Devi Brown? She’s the founder of the wellness lifestyle brand Karma Bliss. In her new book, CRYSTAL BLISS, Devi seeks to connect you to the innate energy of these powerful stones. Take a deep breath and get ready to attract some good vibes to aid you in this journey called life.

This book is your spirit guide to finding purpose, happiness and cosmic order. Once you unlock the power in these stones and gems, you’ll beat back the bad vibes, live life to the fullest and achieve CRYSTAL BLISS.

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Each chapter is written for easy reference to a particular crystal or intention in mind. For example, Chapter 8 is “Crystals for Self Love.” It features the Rhodonite crystal for self-worth. There’s a description, where to use it, where it’s found, spiritual growth powers, physical healing powers, corresponding chakra and mantra.

This small, easy-to-read hardbound book also contains full-color photographs.

Published by Simon & Schuster 2017, CRYSTAL BLISS is the perfect little book for the newager on your Christmas list this holiday season.